Volkswagen’s “Fun Theory”

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In the age of You Tube, with millions of videos falling short in an attempt to get the public’s attention, Volkswagen‘s add agency DDB Stockholm came up with a series of videos that have gone viral. 

Their new campaign, “The Fun Theory” (or Rolighetsterorin), is a series of experiments that set out to discover if making ordinary tasks fun, like taking the stairs instead of the escalator or throwing trash away, will encourage people to make better decisions and change behaviors.  The idea is to ultimately change the way people feel about driving environmentally friendly cars by showing the fun side of acting in a responsible way.

One of the videos called “Piano Stairs” has had over 1.5 million views on YouTube.

“The campaign has just started up with a number of experiments in which the theory—that fun can change people’s behavior—is tested in various situations,” says DDB Stockholm creative director Andreas Dahlqvist, “Volkswagen’s answer to the theory will be presented at a later stage on a separate website amongst other media. The site will display their whole range of environment technologies and cars—many, many fun ways to do something for the environment.”

This is a great example of an established brand stepping out of their comfort zone, and the subtle brand placement, combined with content that is being spread around the global market through social media, guarantees that people are going to be sharing and discussing Volkswagen and this campaign.

Check out the “Fun Theory” videos:

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